07/09/17 – Solo Recital – South Virginia – Gethsemane Lutheran Church – USA

Who
Solo Recital
When
Sunday, July 9, 2017
No Time Yet - All Ages
Where
Gethsemane Lutheran Church (map)
901 4th Street South Virginia, Minnesota, 55792, USA
South Virginia, USA
Other Info
Kati Eriikka Arikoski-Johnson is invited to play solo recital in Virginia by The Finnish-Americans and Friends of Hibbing and The Kaleva Organisation.

CONCERT PROGRAM:

Jean Sibelius: Impromptu op. 5, nr. 5
Leevi Madetoja: The Garden of death, op. 41
Jean Sibelius: 3 pieces from tree serie, op. 75
Einar Englund: Introductione & Toccata
Einojuhani Rautavaara: Fiddlers op. 1
Jean Sibelius: Kyllikki op. 41




Thanks to Jean Sibelius (b. 1865-1957), music occupies a central position in Finnish society. This is why I have chosen to build the concert program so that it will be framed by music from Sibelius. He helped to develop a national identity of Finland during its struggle for independence. Although Jean Sibelius is best known for his powerfully expressive symphonic works, he also wrote exciting music in more intimate genres. I will start by playing one of his Impromptus, where one can hear inspiration of Finnish national instrument, Kantele, which also composer himself could play.

The second piece, Leevi Madetoja’s (b. 1887-1947) work, was released in 1918 under the title "Improvisation in memory of my brother Yrjö". Therefore, the first movement of his work is very fragile, and has a short culmination with an outbreak, which suggests that the piece was composed while Madetoja was in grief and shock after his brother's death in the Finnish Civil War. Madetoja’s music serves as a garden for the emotions surrounding death.

The tree cycle of Jean Sibelius contains some of the most loved piano pieces by him. The lonely pine is a song that was interpreted for fins as a symbol of a strong Finland, which stands against the wind from the east. Aspen spirits Impressionism and silence that can be experienced only in the north, and in spruce can one hear waltz melodies and, as a contrast, some fast, powerful broken chords.

One of the most important Finnish symphonists since Jean Sibelius Jean was Einar Englund (b. 1916-1999). He was 17 when he began studies at the Sibelius Academy in Helsinki in 1933. Following his graduation in 1941, Englund was conscripted into military service. During his time in the Finnish Continuation War he was wounded in his hand, which almost brought to an end his hopes of pursuing a career as a concert pianist. He would often recall the bizarre, though life-threatening incident, with a smile. He composed his solo piano work Introductione and Toccata 1950.

Einojuhani Rautavaara (b. 1928-2016) was born in Helsinki, but had ancestors from Ostrobothnia region in Finland. It is a region of lakes and forests, attractive country towns and a premier summer holiday destination for Finns. A young composer who found himself engaged by his folk roots wrote these rustic pieces.
The concert will end by a piece named Kyllikki, name referring to a character in Finnish epic "Kalevala". She is a cheerful and happy woman who would like to dance. Dance rhythms, you can also hear in the last movement. This work may well be Sibelius's best large-scale piano work of more than one movement. Kyllikki can be regarded as the principal and final work of Sibelius's Kalevala-inspired piano period.

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